Lower Back Pain With Sciatica

Best Stretches for Sciatica

Hello I'm Heather Moore owner ofTotal Performance Physical Therapy. Today we're going to go over the best exercisesfor sciatica. There's really one main stretch that you can do a bunch of different waysif you're getting numbness and tingling down your leg, if you'r e getting pain throughyour back, in your butt you should do this stretch multiple times throughout the day,when you do it you want to try and hold it for about 30 seconds, you want to try andperform 6 repetitions if you can't do it for that long that's okay hold it for as longas you can, if for any reason these are going to increase your pain you need to stop immediatelyand call your but this should alleviate

a lot of your body pain specially if you aresitting for a long period of time or you get a lot of pain down your leg. The first oneis in the seated position you want to sit up nice and straight, you want to cross yourankle over your knee if you feel a stretch there that's where you need to stop, if youdon't feel a stretch there all you wann do is sit up and lean forward and you shouldfeel a greater stretch through your butt, through your hamstring which is in the backof your leg and through the side of your leg, you may even feel a little bit on your backdepending on where your tight is again this shouldn't hurt and should feel like a goodstretch, you could do this sitting at your

desk all day long, you also want to make surethat you concentrate on both sides not just the side that hurts, piriformis muscle whichis what this is stretching on both sides and will tag evenly on your sacrum or your tailbone so you want to make sure that you do both sides and not just one. The next wayto do this stretch is standing up, you want to find a surface where you can put your leg,your hip at about 90 degrees and you're going to bring your foot up and you're just goingto have it lay on the table and you're going to let your knee drop to the side, if yourknee doesn't fall all the way down that's okay, don't force it down let it just staythere again if you get, if you're in this

position and you don;t feel a stretch youcan now begin to lean forward, you're going to feel the stretch in your back, in yourglut, in your hamstring and all the side of your leg, this should not be painful it shouldfeel like a nice stretch this one also you want to do 30 seconds hold about 6 repetitionsand you want to make sure that you hit both sides. The final way to do this stretch islaying down, so you want to lay on your back and this is a good thing to do when you getup in the morning, go ahead and bend both your knees up and then you're going to crossyour ankle over your knee, now again if this is where you feel a stretch stop right thereand hold it, if you don't feel a stretch in

this position you're going to reach both armsbehind this leg and you're going to pull it up towards your chest, you should feel a stretchagain in the back, in the glut, in the hamstring or maybe even on the side of the leg, it shouldnot hurt it should feel like a nice gentle stretch, you want to hold this about 30 secondsand you want to do about 6 of those you can do this as many times during the day as youwould like there is no set number or times that you can do this, anytime your tight youcan do this and it will not harm you.

Piriformis Syndrome Low Back Pain Sciatica Sock Doc

Hey, this is Gangemi, The Sock Doc.Today's Sock Doc tutorial is on piriformis syndrome, lower back issues, andsciatictype pain, or what many people perceive as sciatictype pain. LaraO'Brien, who is a principal dancer with Carolina Ballet, is going to behelping us out today, and we're going to go through some of these common ailmentsand some things that you can do, hopefully at home or with a friendto alleviate some of the pain that you might be having. First on sciatic nerve, let's talk about that.Your sciatic nerve comes

down the back of your thigh here and comesall the way down and exits the back of your knee, which is called the poplitealregion, and then forms two common nerves, your common peroneal and yourtibialis nerve. Down here in the lower leg is where most ofthe people experience actually true sciatic type pain. This is where youmight get some numbness, some tingling, some loss of feeling in your toes,your foot area, or your calf. A lot of people think that this area, justbecause the sciatic nerve comes down through here and in your glute regionis actually sciatic type pain,

but it's actually usually not that. It's calledsclerotogenous type pain. What pain in this region is, this sclerotogenouspain, is a referred pain from other areas, other areas of tissue, mostcommonly muscles, ligaments, and tendons. Or it can even be a direct tightnessof the hamstring muscle, or even your glute max which we're going totalk about in a minute. Sciatica is a symptom most often misdiagnosed,but when the sciatic nerve is even pinched up in the lower back regionhere, it could be from a disc issue, it could be from some arthritis, orit could be from some muscle

imbalance, some instability of your biomechanicsof your pelvis that's impairing the sciatic nerve, putting somepressure on it, resulting in pressure all the way down and causing numbness,or pain, or discomfort in the foot. However, you end up dealing withthe issue usually way up here where the sciatic nerve originates, or starts to cometogether from the nerves of the lower back and the sacral region. The most common muscle is your piriformis.The piriformis muscle comes off of the front part of your sacrum actually,tucked in on the side here, and

then comes to the outside of your hip here.That piriformis muscle like this, you can turn around, does two things:It turns your foot out, and it brings your leg up and elevates it, whichyou can do that on both sides. You can see they're pretty symmetrical. Someonewith pretty bad piriformis syndrome, or pain in their piriformis is,first of all, they're going to feel pain deep in their butt region, in theglute, especially right here on the side, and they're going to have some imbalanceor pain doing that motion from side to side.

The sciatic nerve, pretty much in most people,80 percent, it is said, the sciatic nerve comes below your piriformismuscle. In about 20 percent of people, the sciatic nerve actually goes throughthat piriformis muscle. If you had an injury to your piriformis muscleresulting in imbalance, or resulting in a hip rotation issue, then thatcan put pressure on that sciatic nerve and cause pain in your foot. I'm going to show you in a minute how to dealwith that sciatic nerve, but the other muscle we're going to talk aboutreal quick for a second is the

Sciatica and low back pain treated with Applied Kinesiology

My name is Stefania Cardinale, I'm 33 years old. In the year 2000, I was in a motorcycle accident. I was on the back seat and a car sideswiped us. The right side of my body was hit, especially my leg. In recent years, I've been suffering from various types ofpain, mainly on the right side of my body. Nowadays, I can't stand for very long, nor can I wear highheeled shoes. This provokes pain in my back and leg. The pain is constant. It's generally mild but it is always there.

My right leg is very weak. There is pain over one spot in particular right on my spinal column. It feels like a constant bruise, even though I've never had a direct blow to this area. I've been on birth control pills since 18 years old. I have other symptoms like abdominal bloating and indigestion. I am frequently thirsty, so I drink a lot of water. The following are the highlights of the first examination and treatment of Stefania by Robert Morrison. The entire visit of approximately 45 minutes has been edited for the viewer. There's a saying that quot;The body never liesquot;.

This is why we analyze posture. It is the language of the body. By analyzing posture, we can gain a lot of information about a patient in just a few seconds. By placing my hands on her pelvis, we see an imbalance: the right side is higher than the left. The left shoulder is higher than the right. The right hand hangs lower than the left. The right ear is higher than the left. Does this hurt your low backé Yes it pulls here.

Try the other side. This is much easier righté Yes. MANUAL MUSCLE TESTING Now, we want to find out which muscles are functioning neurologically and which aren't. More specifically, if individual muscles are neurologically inhibited they won't support the bones and joints. This side locks as it should. But this side doesn't resist the test pressure. This is very important because if the ankle is not stable, there will be repercussions throughout her body. Push.Push harder Stefania.

This muscle is inhibited. However, if she touches this musclewhere it attaches to the pelvic bone, Push up and out the muscle gains strength. This is because when there is a physical trauma, muscles are injured right where they attach to bone. So as she touches the area of injury Push the muscle regains its strength. Without touching it Push out and up the muscle is weak. Very little strength here also. But if she touches the muscle's attachmentto bone, it becomes stronger.

Push. harder.she lacks strength in this muscle also, but if she touches the muscle's attachment to bone .Push.it regains strength. MANUAL THERAPY What I am doing now isn't exactly a massage. Rather we are activating neurological reflex mechanisms within the tendons. When a muscle is injured, these receptors become shortcircuited and stay that way for years. What I am doing is reactivating the neurological pathways. Now we've turned this muscle back on.

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