Best Shoes For Sciatic Nerve Problems

Yoga For Sciatica Yoga With Adriene

Hello everyone. Welcome to yoga with Adriene. I'm Adriene, and today'spractice is yoga for Sciatica or for lower back pain, nerve pain. This is a really great practiefor anyone who has dealt with any flare ups in the lower back body. Perhaps you're recovering from an injury, and you're needing toease back into things.

Be really mindful. If you are in pain now, youmight need to ask your or you might need to checkin and just make sure you're doing the right exercise, but this is a really yummy practice that's going to balancestrengthening and stretching in a really kind and loving way. So, for today's practice,you're gonna need a towel,

a little towel if you have it. If you have a yoga strap, awesome, or if you have a tie,you can use that as well. Just something about yay long that will help you find length. Alright, so hop into something comfy. Grab your towel or your strap or your tie, and let's get started.

(lively, bouncy strumming music) Alright, the first thing we're gonna do is going to be a supine on our backs, and you're gonna need your towel or your strap or yourtie, whatever you got. So, put it right to your sideso you can grab it easily, and then bend the knees, use your hands to slowlyroll down to your back.

Get situated here. Connect with your breath. Knees are up towards the sky. Feet are on the mat. And take a second to bringthe hands to the belly or right to the hip points here, and just notice what'sgoing on in the lower back. If there's a space, ifyou can crawl your hand

between the lower back, see if you can make an adjustment tobring your lower back flush with the mat. And if you have to adjustyour feet, please do. So the lower back is nowpressing against the mat and since we're here to practice and go the extra mile, self love and care, take a moment to close your eyes,

Electrical Signal Therapy to Treat Nerve Pain

This is Silvester at the Next Step Footand Ankle , and I'm going to talk to you a little bit today about somethingthat, for our neuropathy patients, has been a real game changer. It's really given usanother powerful tool in being able to eliminate or significantly decrease the symptoms ofpainful peripheral neuropathy. There's also significant evidence that this procedure,this treatment that we do, actually helps the nerves regrow helps the nerves to healand become better. It's a matter of circulation in the nerve, it's also a matter of openingthe gates that how a nerve functions is that there are gates that allow electricalcurrents to pass down the nerve, and the nerve

uses a lot of energy to keep those gates eitheropen or closed, depending on what it's trying to do. The anatomy of a nerve is such that if youtook a nerve out of this young lady's back and down to her foot. If you spread that nerveout and magnified it at maybe 1000 times, the relative proportions of the nerve wouldbe like a string the length of a football field.A nerve uses more energy than any cell in the body, so the nerve, being that long andthat skinny, the nerve's ability to heal itself and deliver energy to all those littlegates all along that nerve is somewhat hampered.

This treatment tends to restore that and helpsthe nerve heal. It's a very simple procedure, and I'm going to show you this is themachine, it's called the Neurogenx 4000 Pro. It has an electrical current that goesinto the nerve and helps fire the nerve repeatedly over a period of time. Our treatments lastabout 3045 minutes, depending on the severity of the patient's symptoms. We do this withan integrated nerve block. I'm going to show you where the nerves comedown into your leg. There's one right here, and this is called the common peroneal nerve.We're going to put one patch there. There's a nerve right back here, and this is the tibialnerve, and that comes down right there, and

we'll put a patch there. All the nervesthat innervate the bottom of the foot come through here, and this is called the tarsaltunnel and the plantar nerves. Then on the top of the foot there's also a deep peronealnerve and there are also branches of the superficial peroneal nerve that are up here. Dependingon where the symptoms are the worst, we kind of move the pads to try and treat the nervesthat we're involved with. If you don't have very many symptoms on the deep peronealnerve, we do it up here at the superficial peroneal nerve. The first pad goes over the common fibularnerve, the next one goes back here where the

tibial nerve comes down into the leg and it'skind of deep right there. Most of the time we'll treat the superficial peroneal nerve.Then, on the inside of the foot, the area of the tarsal tunnel. Now that's all setup for nerve treatment, and all we do is turn the machine on, and we just bring up the intensityuntil the patient feels it. It shouldn't be uncomfortable, but you should be able tofeel it when it's working. It's a fairly substantial current. The next thing that wedo with this is either during or after the procedure, we give local anesthetic blocksinto those nerves that are most badly affected by nerve disease. We determine that with oural examination. Those injections consist

of just a longacting local anesthetic andso the patient leaves, they may be numb for a while or they may not feel any numbness.What happens is, the signal therapy followed with the local anesthetic therapy causes thenerve to be able to reestablish itself as far as the surrounding environment with nutritionalsupport, vasodilation and really helps the nerves heal themselves. This has been, inabout 80% of our patients who undergo this therapy, they have significant relief of theirperipheral neuropathy. It's not a one time thing. We have to do it 13 times, and sometimeswe extend it beyond that. 13 treatments in general, but sometimes we extend it beyondthat. That's electrical nerve stimulation

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