Massage On Sciatica

Sciatica Animation

Sciatica or sciatic neuralgia is a commoncondition in which one of the spinal nerve roots of the sciatic nerve is compressed resultingin lower back, buttock and leg pain. Sciatic nerve is a large nerve derived from 5 spinalnerve roots: L4, L5, S1, S2 and S3. It runs from the lumbar spine through the buttockdown the leg and the foot on the posterior aspect. There is one sciatic nerve on eachside of the body. Typically, only one side of the body is affected.A typical sciatica pain is described as a sharp shooting pain in the lower back, downthe buttock, thigh and leg on one side of the body. There may also be numbness, burningand tingling sensations. The pain can get

worse with sitting, moving, sneezing, or coughing.The patterns of pain depend on which nerve root is compressed, and follow the dermatomedistribution. The most common cause of sciatica is a herniatedspinal disc. The spinal disc is a soft elastic cushion that sits in between the vertebraeof the spine. With age, the discs become rigid and may crack, the gellike center of thedisc may protrude out and become a herniation outside the normal boundaries of the disc.Disc herniation presses on the nerve root as it exits the spine.In majority of the cases the condition resolves by itself after a few weeks of rest and conservativetreatment. Pain relief, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory

drugs and muscle relaxants may be prescribed.Stretching exercises and physical therapy may be recommended.Surgery may be needed if the pain doesn't go away after 3 months or more of conservativetreatments. The herniated disc may be removed in a procedure called discectomy. Or, in anotherprocedure called laminotomy, part of the bone of the vertebrae may be cut to make room forthe nerve.

How To Massage Sciatica To Reduce Leg Pain Massage Monday 226

Hi everyone. This is Yasuko and it's timefor Massage Monday. This week I'm going to talk about how to selftreatsciatica or more accurately pseudosciatica using a lacrosse ball or Thera Cane. I oftenhave clients come in with quot;sciaticaquot; issues with a pain shooting down from the hip tothe leg and even numbness in the leg. So what is sciaticaé Sciatica is an inflammation ofsciatic nerve that runs through the hip and down the side of the leg or the back of theleg. The common symptom is the radiating pain from the hip all the way to the leg. Medicallyspeaking it is caused by a pinch of the nerve in the lower back by herniated discs or bonespurs which can be medically treated by a

surgery as a last resort. However, this pain that shoots down the legmay be caused simply by tight gluteal muscles, the muscles in the buttocks, specificallyby the trigger points found in gluteus minimus. Let's call this pseudosciatica because it'snot really sciatica but has the similar pain like the real sciatica and it makes it hardto get up from the chair or stand straight. Trigger Points are the tight spots in musclesthat are stuck in a contracted state and forgot to release. They are sore or painful to touchbut they also cause pain elsewhere called referred pain. This is what I mean. In thiscase, the X's are the trigger points in gluteus

minimus and the red areas are the referredpain. When you loosen these trigger points the pain in the red area will be gone. Thesetrigger points can be created from various reasons such as sitting crooked for a longtime in front of the computer, TV, car, airplane, especially if you keep a wallet in your buttpocket, or from playing sports like tennis, walking, running, swimming, and cycling fora long period of time. To treat the trigger points first find thehip bone. Then go down on the side of the hip to find the greater trochanter which isthe big bump on the top of the thigh bone. The gluteus minimus is located between theselandmarks. It is the deepest layer of the

gluteus muscles. You can also lean side toside and feel the muscles contracting as you lean to the target side. Then put a lacrosseball on the muscle and lean against the wall and roll it over the tight spot for 10 timeswhich should take no more than 20 seconds. You don't want to do it too long because itinvolves some pain and you don't want to bruise the muscle. If you are working on the rightside, stand on your left leg. Or almost lift your right foot to loosen the target muscle.When you massage the muscle should be relaxed and loose so you can dig deeper. As you sawthis muscle gets contracted and tight when you put on your weight on this side. If youhave a pain on the side of the leg, look for

a painful spot more towards the side betweenthe hip bone and thigh bone. If you have a pain in the back of the leg, look for a painfulspot towards the center of the glutes under the hip bone. If lacrosse ball is too hardand painful, you can use a tennis ball. You can also use Thera Cane if you have one.With Thera Cane put the ball on the tip on the gluteus minimus from behind, hold it withboth hands in a comfortable position, lean to the other side, and press on the tightspot for 10 times. BTW if you don't have Thera Cane it's a great selfhealing tool. I'llput the link below. Repeat this treatment three to six times aday every day to see the results. If you tend

to sit in front of the computer for a longtime and if that's causing this problem it's a good way to take a short break because itshouldn't take more than 20 seconds. Remember only do it 10 times at a time. Besides the daily selftreatment I highlyrecommend working with a massage therapist in your area who knows and believes in TriggerPoint Therapy who can treat you and check if you are doing it right. If you have a pain in your body and want tofind out if Trigger Point Therapy can help, let me know and I will cover in the futuretutorials. Holistically speaking I would avoid

Massage Tutorial Gluteal region gluteus maximus piriformis sciatica

Hi everyone, I'm Ian Harvey, massage therapist. This is my friend Christina. Today we're going to be talking about thegluteal region. Some people have some trepidation about workingwith the butt, but this is an important area. Your gluteal region connects your legs toyour body, it affects your low back, it affects your abdomen, it affects pretty much everything,and yet a lot of the time we don't even touch it as massage therapists. So let's look at some easy ways of workingwith this area.

First, let's talk about undraping. I like to come at the glutes from the topdown, and from the leg up. When I'm coming down from the back and theback is already undraped, maybe I'm working down this side of the body and I feel likeundraping the hip, I'll restrain the drape at around L5 or the sacrum. And then I will fold over. And at this point, you could tuck into theside here but I usually don't because I'll be working a little under the drape here,which we'll see in a second.

If I wanted access to the entire hipgluteregion, I would restrain the folded over drape right around the PSIS. So come around to the side a few inches, outto this lateral sacrum, restrain the drape there, and then fold over again, and thentuck at the inner thigh between the knee and the hip. To undrape from the leg, so let's say thatyou have the leg undraped already, if I wanted to undrape this further, first I would restrainthe drape at this tuck at the inner thigh, and this will allow me to draw the drape mediallywithout the drape getting away from me, or

creating any sort of draft. From here I can work on most of the hip, Ican even work up into the low back if I were to leave this drape up. You can of course tuck around to the sideif you want to offer a little more security. When I'm draping this area, I make sure todo a lot of bunching of the fabric. I'll bunch the fabric up, and then I'll endwith a fold. The fold keeps the fabric in place, the bunchedup fabric prevents any sort of draft from happening, it creates a very nice thermalbarrier.

So, if I'm working in this area and her leg'smoving, her muscles are moving, there's much less chance of this drape coming undone orsliding off. So let's talk about some relevant landmarks. First, let's find the SI joint. That's the sacroiliac joint. You'll find it if you palpate the ilium, thisbroad sheet of bone that forms the posteriorlateral part of the pelvis. And then come medial a bit, and you're goingto hit this big roadblock.

This is the edge of the triangular sacrum. A lot of the trouble that can happen in thehips you'll find right along this SI joint. People will report pain right here, and theymight report it as low back pain. So when people say they've got low back pain,ask them to point it out, they may just point out this ridge of bone here. This is a place where trigger points oftenhide, but if there's any trigger point activity here, I want you to look at all of the thingsthat connect right there at that SI joint. We'll talk about that more in a second.

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